Mini Book Review of “Sauntering Thru: Lessons in Ambition, Minimalism, and Love on the Appalachian Trail” by Codey James Howell PHD

This book continued my trend of Appalachian Trail and hiking related titles in 2022. I again found myself fascinated by the idea of thru hiking the Appalachian Trail. Howell’s work only served to whet my appetite even more for such an experience. Howell, who goes by the trail handle of Raiden, intended this book as a sort of journal recording his day to day activities on the trail, however, in the end it turned into so much more. On the trail Raiden met his future wife Chilli Bin. As the pair make progress on the trail, readers are treated to an account of their deepening relationship. Time seems to stand still for the pair of hikers and I found myself sad for them both as the trail came to an end.

This book does a wonderful job of demonstrating the magical nature of the Appalachian Trail and serves to elevate it to nearly mythical proportions. It’s a wonderful read for any interested in the trail.

Mini Book Review of “Only When I Step On It: One Man’s Inspiring Journey to His the Appalachian Trail Alone” by Peter Conti

Plagued by a past injury and chronic pain, this book chronicles author Peter Conti’s quest for healing on the Appalachian Trail. While not technically a thru hiker, Conti tackled the AT over the course of 2 years. His hypothesis was simple, to hike every mile of the AT, the chronic and severe pain he suffered from a hip injury would have to heal and, ultimately, disappear. Conti’s story is very much one of overcoming debilitation. I would recommend this for anyone who is at the wrong end of climb. It could be injury, age, weight, bad circumstances … whatever the obstacle, Conti’s story serves as an example of what can be accomplished with patience, grit, and determination.

Mini Book Review of “Appalachian Trail Thru-Hike” by John Gignilliat

While not a literary masterpiece, this book is charming. It details the daily journal of a couple’s thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail. It includes the interesting things they saw, people they encountered, places they stayed, and even their meals. A careful read will glean some good tips that can be used on extended hiking trips. I may never get to thru-hike the entire AT, but I hope to put some of the author’s tips to good use. I gave this book five stars simply because I find the topic so interesting. If you don’t share my interest in the Appalachian Trail or extended hiking trips, this may not be the book for you.

Mini Book Review of “AWOL on the Appalachian Trail” by David Miller

AWOLThis is a book about a guy hiking the Appalachian Trail. It is not full of action or excitement. He didn’t have to battle any bears or mountain lions with his bare hands. Rather, he just walked. But his story is engaging. David Miller quit his job to begin his quest of hiking the entire trail and as I read I became invested in his adventure. I wanted him to succeed. It took me quite awhile to read as I often put it aside in favor of other books, but I always found myself returning to check on his progress. Hikers and outdoor enthusiasts are sure to find this book interesting and, to make it more enticing, I’m pretty sure I found it for free on the Kindle.