Mini Book Review of “Made to Crave: Satisfying Your Deepest Desire With God, Not Food” by Lysa TerKeurst

Before I review the book, I feel I must first acknowledge that I am certainly no Lysa TerKeurst’s target audience. Made to Crave is written from a female perspective to females. TerKeurst frequently references the “Jesus Girls” she had in mind when she wrote this book. Ultimately, Made to Crave is about food addiction and the spiritual ramifications of an unhealthy relationship with food. TerKeurst’s premise is that we are all designed to crave, as revealed in Scripture, ““How lovely is your dwelling place, O LORD Almighty! My soul yearns, even faints, for the courts of the LORD; my heart and my flesh cry out for the living God” (Psalm 84:1 – 2). Unfortunately, many of us misplace our cravings and try to satisfy them with food. I believe TerKeurst’s approach is much needed in face of a dilemma that is so common. Though I am not the target audience, I highly recommend this book to any Christian who has placed food on the throne of God. It helps address the mental and spiritual sides to weight loss.

Mini Book Review of “The Ultramarathon Guide: A Simple Approach to Running Your First Ultramarathon” by Michael D’Aulerio

I grabbed this book off of Amazon because I am a runner with budding aspirations to complete an ultramarathon. This book by Michael D’Aulerio is a great primer for such events. It is separated into chapters with each containing practical and useful information. D’Aulerio offers tips on topics such as what to bring to an ultra, how to stay motivated, and how to fuel and hydrate. It is a helpful read that I can see referring to from time to time as I continue to grow as a runner. I highly recommend it for any novice runner who is contemplating an ultra.

Dying 2 Self Episode #3: The Old Man Must Die

In this episode of the Dying 2 Self Podcast, I examine the phrase “Dying 2 Self” by looking at Scripture that converts the meaning behind the concept. I then apply that concept to our pursuit of Health & Wellness.

The below resources are referenced during this recording:

Francis Chan sermon “Dying to Self: https://youtu.be/l-jpc1pU-_w

The book Made to Crave: Satisfying Your Deepest Desire with God, Not Food by Lysa Terkeurst

What Is Meant by the Phrase “Die to Self”?

The idea of Dying to Self may sound odd to to some, but for Christians, the concept can be found laced throughout Scripture. The Apostle Paul wrote the following to the Galatians:

24 Now those who belong to Christ Jesus crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.

Galatians 5:24

Paul writes that Christ followers have “crucified” the flesh. In other words, the moment we trust Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior, we are choosing to crucify, or kill, our fleshly desires. To claim Christ and continue to pursue earthly passions is inconsistent with the Christian faith. Paul isn’t suggesting we must be perfect or that there is no room for error, in fact, he writes in his first letter to the Corinthians, “… I die daily” (1 COR 15:31). The idea of “dying daily” means we must choose Christ over the world every, single day.

I believe it’s fair to say that if you are going to follow Christ, the old man (or woman) inside of you must die. To quote Paul from the King James, “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.” Paul says our old man must die so we may be freed from the impact of sin in our lives.

Too often, we Christians claim Christ but then try to live on the fence. We live with one foot in the Kingdom and the other in the world – this is a recipe for disaster. When we repent from our sins, we are turning from our old worldly pursuits and pursuing Christ. It is impossible to serve two masters. We can not be a slave to sin and slave to Christ at the same time (Matthew 6:24)!

Christ expounded on this concept when He told his disciples to “Take up your cross and follow Me” (Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, Luke 9:23). Taking up your cross isn’t meant to imply it is a burden to follow Christ, but it does imply we should be willing to die for Him. It is a call to die to self … to surrender. Gotquestions.com in an article on this subject asks the following questions:

• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means losing some of your closest friends?

• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means alienation from your family?

• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means the loss of your reputation?

• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means losing your job?

• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means losing your life?

https://www.gotquestions.org/take-up-your-cross.html

Genuine commitment to Christ involves the willingness to let go of self, your desires, your pet sins; all must play second fiddle to Christ. A Christian who has died to self strives every day to put God’s will for their lives ahead of their own. Christ says whomever is willing to lose their life in this manner will ultimately save it (Luke 9:24).

I will close with this New Living Translation of Paul’s words in Philippians 3:7, “I once thought these things were valuable, but now I consider them worthless because of what Christ has done.”

Pursuing Christ has a way of teaching us we must die to self.

Mini Book Review of “Running to Leadville” by Brian Burk.

This book is very similar to author Brian Burk’s other book ‘Unfinished’. Like its counterpart, there are many grammatical errors. So much so that I felt I should lead with that in this review as it could deter some people. I will say this, however, it is a good book. Burk’s very strong at describing the ultra runs that are featured in his stories. In this case, that’s the Leadville 100. If you are even mildly interested in long distance trail runs, you’ll enjoy this book. Like ‘Unfinished’, there is a huge plot development, however, it occurs earlier in the story and doesn’t come off as an interruption to the plot. If you are choosing between the two titles, pick this one.

Mini Book Review of “Unfinished: Finding Yourself Among a Lifetime of Miles and the JFK 50-Ultra-Marathon” by Brian Burk

Full disclosure; I didn’t know what I was getting when I downloaded this book for my Kindle. I thought I was getting the author’s account of his own adventure running an ultramarathon and, as someone who has the goal of running a 50k this year, that was of interest. However, what I got was a fictionalized account of a young Olympic hopeful marathon runner and his girlfriend in a small, sleepy little West Virginia town. I suspect the characters and locations, including the running shoe store the protagonist works in, are all drawn from the author’s own experiences. Certainly, there were enough details of the JFK 50 that I expect Brian Burn has run it himself. Those details lended a bit of realism to the characters and the events described throughout the book. I found it readable and engaging. Now for my quibbles … and there are a couple. First, I downloaded this through my Kindle Unlimited and, like many of the books available on the platform, I am assuming this one is self-published. I have nothing against self-published works at all … I like good books regardless of how they are published, however, this one needed some more proof-reading. There were some mistakes in syntax and grammar. Normally, such mistakes are forgivable if the book is written well, however, in this case the mistakes interrupted the flow of the story enough to be a distraction.

As for the story itself, I liked it. Without spoiling anything, I will say there is a huge plot development about two thirds of the way through that happens rather abruptly and changes the whole story. I wasn’t for it. In fact, I almost quit reading. Instead, I sat the book aside for a couple of days and then soldiered through. Other readers may deal better with it than I did.

If you are a fan of ultra running and enjoy fiction tales, my guess is you would like this book. I will certainly be on the lookout for other novels written by Brian Burk, but I think he is capable of much better than this. I give it a solid 2.5 out of 5 stars.